Invest the Time and Money – You say you don’t have time or money to take care of yourself? How about, “I’m too old” for good measure?

Invest the Time and Money – You DO Have Both!

Here’s the thing about excuses: They’re nonsense.

(There’s another popular term we won’t use here.)

You say you don’t have time or money to take care of yourself? How about, “I’m too old” for good measure?

Those are the most common barriers to fitness that we hear. They are all NONSENSE.

Facts are: You have the time and money – and you are NEVER TOO OLD to benefit from exercise. In fact, by this point in life, you probably have the extra super-power of motivation that younger people simply lack: If you don’t move your body, you will lose the ability to use it. Period.


No. 1: ‘I Don’t Have Time’

To paraphrase a famous saying, People who don’t have time to stay strong will lose more time when they get weak.

Let’s say people get an average of 25,915 days, or about 71 years, to live. Of that, they spend just 0.69 percent (or 180 days) exercising. That’s according to a survey of more than 9,000 people around the world.

The survey also reports that people stare at a screen 41 percent of the time, or 10,625 days.

The World Health Organization and the US government suggest people get at least 2½ hours every week of moderate intensity exercise. A Harvard study says that just 15 minutes a day can add three years to your life. And the Journal of the American Medical Association said that not exercising puts you at greater risk than smoking and diabetes.

Still say you don’t have time?


‘It’s Too Expensive’

Last time we checked, walking around the neighborhood was free. So was working in the garden. So was tossing a frisbee with your grandkids. So were jogging and countless other forms of good exercise.

If you want to join a studio, gym or other fitness center, there are many options for every budget.

Exercise reduces health-care costs, including medications, and the time lost to illness and injury. Investing in yourself with fitness pays huge dividends, including financially.

Compare it to…

  1. Tall café latte at Starbucks: $2.95, plus tax. Multiplied by how many you have a month.
  2. Cable or Satellite TV. Subscribers paid an average of $107 per month in 2017.
  3. Hair coloring and highlights: About $80-$150.
  4. Smoking and drinking: The average Boomer who still smokes spends about $150 a month on the habit, not counting health care costs, the Labor Department says. Boomers average another $45 a month on alcohol.

Now, we’re not saying you should spend more or less on this or that item – even fitness. The quality of your exercise program is not directly related to the amount of money you spend on it.

That’s why we consider our pricing very seriously to offer you excellence and value every day.

Think of it as an investment in time and money. The best investment you can make.

At any age.


11 Tips to Move More Every Day

It’s easy to move more throughout the day when you know how to spot the opportunities. Every little bit adds up!

Here are some of the simplest ways to do it.

  1. Start the day with a few light stretches.
  2. Always park at the far end of lots so you’ll walk extra steps to your destination. (Skip the drive-thrus.)
  3. Use stairs instead of elevators when possible. (And forget about moving walkways at the airport!)
  4. Invite coworkers on walking meetings.
  5. Use a standing desk and make calls when standing or walking.
  6. Set a timer to remind you to get up and walk every 30 minutes, at work or at home.
  7. Ask friends or dates to do something active together instead of sitting for a meal.
  8. Dance around when cooking or cleaning the house.
  9. Never stay seated for a commercial break. Get up and move!
  10. Go check the mail every day.
  11. Wear a fitness tracker. It will keep movement top of mind.

Steps like these are easy to see when we think a bit creatively. Have fun. And move, move, move – it feels so good.

 

Healthy Recipe, Pasta with Scallops, Burst Tomatoes, Crispy Garlic, and Herbs

Scallops, often thought of as a luxury product, are now readily accessible in most freezer cases, and a lightning-fast way to boost the protein of a simple pasta meal without the need for cheese. This recipe, inspired by one from the Martha Stewart website, calls for either the thimble-size bay scallops, or the larger sea scallops cut in half. Their mild taste readily melds with the bold flavors of fresh garlic and tomatoes sauteed in heart-healthy olive oil, and whatever herbs you have handy. Serves 4. – Susan Puckett

Ingredients

  • Salt
  • 8 ounces whole-grain pasta
  • 2-3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 4 or 5 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
  • ¼ teaspoon red pepper flakes, or to taste
  • 1 pound bay scallops (or sea scallops, cut in half and tough side muscles removed), patted dry
  • 1 pint grape or cherry tomatoes
  • Freshly ground pepper
  • ¼ cup chopped fresh basil, flat-leaf parsley, mint, or a combination

Instructions

  1. In a large pot of boiling water seasoned generously with salt, add the pasta and cook until al dente according to package directions. Drain, reserving ¼ cup of the pasta water.
  2. While preparing the pasta, heat the oil over medium-high heat in a large skillet. Add the garlic and red pepper flakes, and sauté just until lightly golden, a minute or less, taking care not to burn. Transfer to a small bowl and set aside.
  3. Add the scallops and sauté just until lightly golden on both sides, about 2 minutes, and transfer to a plate. Add the tomatoes to the skillet and cook, stirring frequently, until the skins begin to split, 2 to 3 minutes. Crush the tomatoes with the back of a spoon and season to taste with salt and pepper.
  4. Remove the pan from the heat. Add the reserved scallops, cooked pasta, reserved pasta water, half the herbs, and butter. Toss to combine and melt the butter. Divide among bowls, garnish with reserved garlic and parsley, and serve.

 

Article Credit Jay Croft, creator and owner of Prime Fit Content.

Susan Puckett is a cookbook author and former food editor of The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Follow her at susanpuckett.com.

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